Friday, October 18, 2013

SARSAS General Meeting Agenda (OPEN TO THE PUBLIC) MONDAY, October 28, 2013



                                                          SARSAS General Meeting Agenda
(OPEN TO THE PUBLIC)
MONDAY, October 28, 2013
175 Fulweiler Avenue (the Domes), Auburn, CA 95603 
Contact: SARSAS President Jack Sanchez at 530-888-0281
Meetings are Fourth Monday of each month at 10-11 a.m.

I.      Self- introductions and sign-ins.                       

II.    SARSAS Philosophy – We believe by working together with many individuals and agencies at the same table, we can achieve the mission of SARSAS, which is to return salmon and  steelhead to the entire 33 mile length of the Auburn Ravine

III   Featured Speaker October 28, 2013 is Darryl Hayes, Intake Screens, Inc., “Fish Screens in the Local Area and Update on the Pleasant Grove Canal Screen”

IV.  Gary Mapa, SARSAS Vice President, “For the Good of the Order

Upcoming Speakers:

November 25, 2013, Placer County Supervisor Jim Holmes, “Placer County Water and the Auburn Ravine”

December 23, 2013, Richard Rivas, Natural Resources Conservation Services, Wildlife Biologist, “Declining Species Wildlife Habitat EQIP Initiative”

January 27, 2014, Placer Supervisor Robert Weygandt, “Update on the Placer County Conservation Plan”

February 24, 2014, Remleh Scherzinger, NID General Manager, “NID and the Auburn Ravine”

March 24, 2014, Einar Maisch, "Update on PCWA issues" 

April 28, 2014, Tony Frayji, Frayji Design Group, Inc., “Update on Village 1 Development near Hemphill Dam”

May 19, 2014, Jeff Parks, State Water Board, TBA

June 23, 2014, Anna Ewing, CADFW, TBA             

July 28, 20134 Beaver Specialist Mary Tappel, “Beaver Management in the Age of Salmon Restoration”

August 24, 2014  Mary Olswang, CAFW, TBA








Autumn on the Auburn Ravine - Photographs by SARSAS Photographer Phil Robertson








Nevada Irrigation District's Temporary Fix on Hemphill Dam for Fish Passage

 The theory is that salmon will be directed to the left side of dam by the increased waterflow.  The salmon need pools to get momentum to jump over the barriers.  Will this fix work?  

Government fish passage experts will tell us if this fix is adequate to allow fish to reach six miles of prime spawning habitat upstream of Hemphill Dam.
Phil Robertson supplied these photograph

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Salmon Should Be Moving Up Auburn Ravine Now! Here is Another Comment to Help Salmon Photographers.

Salmon Should Be Moving Up Auburn Ravine Now!  Here is Another Comment to Help Salmon Photographers May Help. 

The Salmon and Steelhead should start moving up Auburn Ravine AFTER THE FIRST MAJOR RAINSTORM so that is the event to watch for.  Some fish will be moving


without the rains but the rains will guarantee their moving up Auburn Ravine to spawn.

All flash board dams should have been removed from Auburn Ravine on October 15 so salmon are returning to spawn. Please take your camera when going to the Ravine to get photos and videos of their return and their spawning. 

Send us your photos/videos to post here and let us know if you see salmon so we can send Steve Hubbard and Phil Robertson to photograph them. Steve is our film maker and can be reached at 916 663 3789.

We are checking dam removal this week.

The Salmon Are Coming! The Salmon Are Coming!
Top of Form
Bottom of Form


Wednesday, October 16, 2013

THE SALMON ARE COMING! THE SALMON ARE COMING!


Salmon Should Be Moving Up Auburn Ravine Now!
All flash board dams should have been removed from Auburn Ravine on October 15 so salmon are returning to spawn. Please take your camera when going to the Ravine to get photos and videos of their return and their spawning. 

Send us your photos/videos to post here and let us know if you see salmon so we can send Steve Hubbard and Phil Roberston to photograph them. Steve is our film maker and can be reached at 916 663 3789.

We are checking dam removal this week.

The Salmon Are Coming! The Salmon Are Coming!

Friday, September 20, 2013

Carol Shaver's Original Poem on Auburn Ravine Salmon

video

TIMELINE OF SALMON AND STEEL HEAD IN AUBURN RAVINE



January: Spring/Winter run Salmon arrive.
Steelhead in AR.

February: Spring/Winter run Salmon arrive.
Steelhead in AR.

March: Mid to late March some fry (2-3 inches long) will move downstream
Spring/Winter run Salmon arrive.
Steelhead in AR.

April: Some fry head downstream
Flashboards up early April (problems for fry)! Coppin dam largest flashboards and un-notched and many large bass.
Steelhead in AR.

May: Possibly some fry head downstream

June: Some fry may stay in AR.

July: Some fry may stay in AR.

August: Some fry may stay in AR.

September: Some fry may stay in AR.

October: Mid-October 1st possible arrival of salmon (no rain, flashboards up).
90-125 cps needed for at least 24 hours; longer is better
Salmon imperiled if AR drops to around 9 CPS and weather is warm.
Competition, pairing, redd prep and egg laying
Already in the Sac, Feather, Yuba and American Rivers
Steelhead arrive.

November: First adult salmon photographed at Lincoln Fish Ladder (11/2/2012)
Salmon continue to arrive in AR and egg laying
Steelhead in AR.

December: Salmon possibly still arriving in AR
Fry hatch 45 to 60 days after fertilized
Steelhead in AR.

Notes: Hi predation of adults by otter, mink and raccoon; natural die-off depends
on how fresh the salmon were.
Some fry may stay in AR all year.
Steelhead follow the Salmon and feed on their eggs.

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Monday, September 23, 2013, Save Auburn Ravine Salmon and Steel Head (SARSAS) General Meeting, Open to the Public


SARSAS General Meeting Agenda
(OPEN TO THE PUBLIC)
MONDAY, September 23, 2013
175 Fulweiler Avenue (the Domes), Auburn, CA 95603 
Contact: SARSAS President Jack Sanchez at 530-888-0281

Meetings are Fourth Monday of each month at 10-11 a.m.

I.      Self- introductions and sign-ins.       

II.    SARSAS Philosophy – We believe by working together with many individuals and agencies at the same table, we can achieve the mission of SARSAS, which is to return salmon and  steelhead to the entire 33 mile length of the Auburn Ravine
.
III. Featured Speaker September 23, 2013 is Beaver Specialist Mary Tappel, “Beaver Management in the Age of Salmonid Restoration with Focus on Beavers in Auburn Ravine"

IV. Jack Sanchez, “For the Good of the Order”

October 28, 2013, SARSAS Fish Passage Specialist Ron Ott, “Fish Passage on the Auburn Ravine”

November 25, 2013, Placer County Supervisor Jim Holmes, “Placer County Water and the Auburn Ravine”

December 23, 2013, Richard Rivas, Natural Resources Conservation Services, Wildlife Biologist, “Declining Species Wildlife Habitat EQIP Initiative”

January 27, 2014, Placer Supervisor Robert Weygandt, “Update on the Placer County Conservation Plan”

February 24, 2014, Remleh Scherzinger, NID General Manager, “NID and the Auburn Ravine”

March 24, 2014, Einar Maisch, "Update on PCWA issues" 

April 28, 2014, Tony Frayji, Frayji Design Group, Inc., “Update on Village 1 Development near Hemphill Dam”

May 19, 2014, Jeff Parks, State Water Board, TBA

June 23, 2014, Anna Ewing, CADFW, TBA







Monday, August 19, 2013

Bay Delta Conservation Plan - the Truth

http://www.sacbee.com/2013/08/18/5657882/editorialdelta-tunnel-project.html

General Meeting Agenda, Monday, August 26, 2013, 10 am at 175 Fulweiler Avenue, Auburn, Ca Room CEO-1



SARSAS General Meeting Agenda
(OPEN TO THE PUBLIC)
MONDAY, August 26, 2013
175 Fulweiler Avenue (the Domes), Auburn, CA 95603 
Contact: SARSAS President Jack Sanchez at 530-888-0281
Meetings are Fourth Monday of each month at 10-11 a.m.

I.      Self- introductions and sign-ins.       

II.    SARSAS Philosophy – We believe by working together with many individuals and agencies at the same table, we can achieve the mission of SARSAS, which is to return salmon and  steelhead to the entire 33 mile length of the Auburn Ravine
.
III. Featured Speaker August 26, 2013, SARSAS Member Robert Hane, “Common Sense Stream Bank Restoration”

IV. Jack Sanchez, “For the Good of the Order”

                                                      
September 23, 2013 Beaver Specialist Mary Tappel, “Beaver Management in the Age of Salmonid Restoration with Focus on Beavers in Auburn Ravine"


October 28, 2013, SARSAS Fish Passage Specialist Ron Ott, “Fish Passage on the Auburn Ravine”

November 25, 2013, Placer County Supervisor Jim Holmes, “Placer County Water and the Auburn Ravine”

December 23, 2013, Richard Rivas, Natural Resources Conservation Services, Wildlife Biologist, “Declining Species Wildlife Habitat EQIP Initiative”

January 27, 2014, Placer Supervisor Robert Weygandt, “Update on the Placer County Conservation Plan”

February 24, 2014, Remleh Scherzinger, NID General Manager, “NID and the Auburn Ravine”

March 24, 2014, Einar Maisch, "Update on PCWA issues" 

April 28, 2014, Tony Frayji, Frayji Design Group, Inc., “Update on Village 1 Development near Hemphill Dam”

May 26 2014, Jeff Parks, State Water Board, TBA

June 23, 2014, Anna Ewing, CADFW, TBA






Sunday, August 4, 2013

Auburn Ravine Project



The Auburn Ravine Project
by Dan Edwards, VP of Conservation for Granite Bay Flycasters

On May 27, 2008, the Club had a surplus and we donated $10,000 to help remove barriers to fish passage on Auburn Ravine. Henry Sandigo, past VP for Conservation told me that our donation had helped build a fish ladder on the gauging station just above Lincoln. Did this do any good?
In Fall 2012, for the first time in 24 years (since 1988) spawning Salmon were able to get past the gauging station for several miles before stopping at the next barrier, Hemphill Dam. Department of Fish and Wildlife surveyed the newly opened creek and counted 273 spawning Salmon on over 50 Redds for the first time in 24 years. The steelhead more likely than not followed the chinook salmon upstream. Population estimates are difficult but in a stable population at least 2 adult Salmon are produced for each spawning salmon who will return to the creek to spawn again. Hatcheries report a 1% to 5% return rate for smolts they release. Chinook salmon lay between 1,500 and 10,000 eggs so more than 2 could survive in an expanding population.
The major funding for this effort was provided by Nevada Irrigation District (NID), California Department of Water Resources, Placer County, Dry Creek Conservancy, and Granite Bay Fly casters. We helped create approximately 546 new adult salmon (2 times 273) for each year the Auburn Ravine is open. There are two more barriers on Auburn Ravine to open the creek all the way to the City of Auburn. I do not know how many Steelhead that our donation may have helped produce but a survey of the Auburn Ravine estimated between 7000 and 8000 Fish per mile.

A major player in this effort was
Save the Auburn Ravine Salmon and Steelhead, founded by Jack Sanchez, president. He had the dream of bringing the salmon and steelhead back to downtown Auburn and now has the help of numerous children, adults and organizations.

Go to www.SARSAS.org and click on the 4th orange line where it says "Click here to view a video about SARSAS." This is an 18 minute, incredible video. 

Click on the top of the Website page on "Videos" to go to a second page where it says, "Click here to see a video." This is a 55 minute video called "Journey of Lifetime" documenting the Salmon and Steelhead returning to the Auburn Ravine above the Gauging Station.

I think our donation forwarded our goals of increasing access for fish and increasing their productivity in the wild. There is public access to Auburn Ravine at 2 parks in Lincoln (McBean and Auburn Ravine), and at every bridge over the Auburn Ravine. Jack Sanchez says that they are working at mitigating the 2 dams, Hemphill and Gold Hill, that remain preventing access to the City of Auburn. They are also working with private owners to develop public access points in the upper Auburn Ravine above Hemphill Dam.
I think our donation was very successful although the total cost of the Gauging Station fish ladder was reported at $900,000. I hope you will be as inspired as I was by these videos and the documented results of restoring fish to the Auburn Ravine Project.

Friday, August 2, 2013

Pescatore Winery Fundraising Dinners for SARSAS, Friday and Saturday, August 16 and 17, 2013

No one cooks Wild Salmon better than Pescatore Winery Owner and Chief Chef Dave Wegner ... No one.

NEW.JPGNEW.JPGNEW.JPGNEW.JPG
Wild Salmon or Tri-Tip Dinner Wine Dinners
Benefit dinners for SARSAS
 hosted by Pescatore Winery www.pescatorewines.com
·       Two Evenings – Choose Wild Salmon or Tri-tips Dinners
·       Friday August 16 and Saturday August 17, 2013 at 6:00pm
·       Pescatore Winery, 7065 Ridge Rd. Newcastle 95658
·       $45 per person
·       Dancing to the music of Jukebox both nights, the great sounds we all danced to last April and the two previous years
·       Dinner, raffle, auction & wine sales all benefiting SARSAS

·       Make checks payable to SARSAS (Tax ID 80-0291680) as a donation and it will be tax deductible for you
Pescatore Logo

Call Dave or Patty Wegner at 916 663 1422 for reservations.  

Thursday, August 1, 2013

Difficulties in Getting Salmon above Hemphill Dam on Auburn Ravine This Coming Fall, 2013

Because we are having troubles negotiating fish passage over Hemphill Dam for salmon this fall, we are trying to get the agencies to approve a Net and Lift Project like the one below to get fish over HH to prime spawning gravel to spawn. So far we have been unsuccessful.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jqR-jFiD_RE
· 

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Pacific Lamprey Eels Have Been Sighted in Auburn Ravine

James Haufler and Phil Robertson has spotted what they believe to be Pacific Lamprey Eels in Auburn Ravine.  Phil and SARSAS Movie Maker Steve Hubbard are searching the Ravine with cameras for the eels to film them.
When I was a boy growing up in Ophir, I saw and caught many eels but have not seen any for years.

Wish Phil and Steve luck so we can display some pics and movies of Eels in the Ravine for you to see..

Movie - Returning Salmon to Auburn Ravine

video

Salmon Confidential - Treachery Against Salmon in British Columbia and Imported Viruses


Saturday, June 22, 2013

SARSAS Returning Salmon to Auburn Ravine

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B78Hvmdw7prcTlhGeGs0WUp4Q3c/edit

Fisheries Resources of the Auburn Ravine

Fisheries Resources of the Auburn Ravine

Protection and restoration of aquatic habitat for anadromous species is one of the primary
goals of the Auburn Ravine/Coon Creek ERP. Six objectives have been identified in
support of this goal (Table 5). Auburn Ravine, Coon Creek, and Doty Ravine provide
habitat of varying quality for Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and chinook salmon
(Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), which are both special status species. The Draft ERP
identified a number of potential opportunities to enhance the aquatic habitat for these
species. However, additional information about how the species are currently using the
existing habitat, such as extent of migration and the location of active spawning and
rearing areas, is needed to focus habitat enhancement efforts.
This focus is desirable for several reasons. Restoration funds are limited and it is
important that projects undertaken provide a meaningful benefit to the species.
Implementing spawning area enhancements when adults cannot bypass the barriers to
reach spawning areas is probably not the most productive use of resources. In addition,
the complexities of private property ownership and the use of the channels for
conveyance and flood control must also be considered. Private property owners, the
water purveyors, and the local jurisdictions responsible for flood management have
expressed their willingness to participate in aquatic habitat enhancement efforts provided
the proposed projects are executed in a manner that reasonably reflects an understanding
of the actual uses and needs of the species in the local watersheds. For example, prior to
considering redesign of a diversion structure to provide passage, the operator would want
to know that there was a reasonable potential for the adults to even reach the structure.
Therefore, development of this comprehensive strategy has been identified as a first-tier
priority (FR6).
Another first-priority objective to enhance fisheries resources is to better manage the
import and transport of sediment in the creek corridor (FR7). This is considered a first
tier-priority because excess sediment is known to compromise aquatic habitat for many
species, and because some of the mechanisms of sedimentation, such as erosion,
backwatering, and flooding are creating significant other problems in the watersheds.
Four additional objectives have been defined for fisheries resources. These address
removal of barriers to adult migration (FR3), juvenile emigration (FR4) and enhancement
of spawning and rearing habitat (FR1 and FR5). Each of these objectives is important,
and is to some degree dependent on the comprehensive strategy described above for
focus. In reaches where salmonid presence and meaningful habitat restoration
Auburn Ravine/Coon Creek ERP Projects 13 Foothill Associates © 2004
opportunities are already known to exist, such as Coon Creek, the assessment and
removal of adult migration barriers should proceed concurrently with development of the
comprehensive strategy. This objective is thus assigned a first-tier priority. The
remaining three objectives are assigned to the second tier since efforts aimed at the
improvement of spawning and rearing habitat and juvenile emigration are most
meaningful only if barriers to adult migration are addressed.
Table 5 - Fisheries Resources Objectives
ID Objective Priority
FR6 Develop a comprehensive strategy to guide implementation of measures
to enhance salmonid habitat in the watersheds that identifies current and
historical migration timing and extent, determines locations of existing
and potential spawning and rearing habitat, and establishes habitat
restoration/enhancement priorities. Incorporate information developed
for the PCCP in this process.
1
FR7 Implement measures throughout watersheds to reduce excess sediment
and sediment imports. Coordinate with assessment, remediation, and
restoration activities under Water Quality and Plant Community tasks.
1
FR3 Based on the priorities established in the salmonid habitat enhancement
strategy, identify barriers for adult chinook salmon and steelhead trout
migration to spawning areas, such as diversion structures or gauging
stations, in all watersheds excluding Markham Ravine. This assessment
of barriers is already underway on Coon Creek. Develop a
comprehensive strategy for improving passage that considers priority,
flow, infrastructure needs, alternative structures, and ownership by 2009.
1
FR4 Based on the priorities established in the salmonid habitat enhancement
strategy, identify barriers for juvenile chinook salmon and steelhead trout
to the Sacramento River during emigration in all watersheds excluding
Markham Ravine, and develop a comprehensive strategy for improving
passage that considers priority, flow, infrastructure needs, alternative
structures, and ownership by 2009.
2
FR1 Based on the priorities identified in the salmonid habitat enhancement
strategy, select areas in the upper watersheds (excluding Markham
Ravine) that are determined to have good potential for spawning habitat
but where stream channel sediment concentration is excessive. Reduce to
target condition (particles < 6.35 mm in diameter to less than 20% of the
gravel/cobble substrate composition, and particles <0 .833="" in="" mm="" p="">
diameter to less than 10% of the gravel/cobble substrate).
2
FR5 Optimize juvenile salmonid rearing habitat in the upper watersheds where
the potential for fish presence is high as determined by the salmonid
habitat enhancement strategy. Optimal habitat should have approximately
60 percent pool habitat and 40 percent riffle habitat.
2
Auburn Ravine/Coon Creek ERP Projects 14 Foothill Associates © 2004
4.0 TASKS
For each objective, a set of tasks has been identified to support implementation of the
objective. The suggested sequencing for the individual tasks reflects the order in which
the interdependent activities should be implemented. Tasks that are not interdependent
are may be implemented concurrently. Not all objectives and tasks are relevant to each
of the four watersheds considered by the Draft ERP (Auburn Ravine, Coon Creek, Doty
Ravine and Markham Ravine). The AR/CC ERP database identifies which tasks pertain
to which watersheds.
4.1 Public Outreach

PO1

Monday, June 3, 2013

SARSAS General Meeting Agenda (OPEN TO THE PUBLIC) MONDAY, June 24, 2013

SARSAS General Meeting Agenda
(OPEN TO THE PUBLIC)
MONDAY, June 24, 2013
175 Fulweiler Avenue (the Domes), Auburn, CA 95603 
Contact: Jack Sanchez at 530-888-0281
Meetings are Fourth Monday of each month at 10-11 a.m.

I.      Self- introductions and sign-ins.       

II.    SARSAS Philosophy – We believe by working together with many individuals and agencies at the same table, we can achieve the mission of SARSAS, which is to return salmon and  steelhead to the entire 33 mile length of the Auburn Ravine
.
III. Featured Speaker: June 24, 2013, Jack Sales, International Dark-Sky Association, “Salmon and Light Pollution”

IV. Jack Sanchez, President of SARSAS, “For the Good of the Order”

Scheduled speakers:

July 22, 2013, Steve Hubbard, SARSAS Board Member and Film Maker, Owner of Gold Country Images, “Power to the People: the Story of Hydroelectricity in the Sierra Nevada”

August 26, 2013, Beaver Specialist Mary Tappel, “Beaver Management in the Age of Salmonid Restoration with Focus on Beavers in Auburn Ravine"

September 23, 2013, Randy Hansen, SARSAS Fish Friendly Farming Coordinator, “Fish Friendly Farming Update”

October 28, 2013, SARSAS Fish Passage Specialist Ron Ott, “Fish Passage on the Auburn Ravine”

November 25, 2013, Placer County Supervisor Jim Holmes, “Placer County Water and the Auburn Ravine”

December 23, 2013, Richard Rivas, Natural Resources Conservation Services, Wildlife Biologist, “Declining Species Wildlife Habitat EQIP Initiative”

January 27, 2014, Placer Supervisor Robert Weygandt, “Update on the Placer County Conservation Plan”

February 24, 2014, Remleh Scherzinger, NID General Manager, “NID and the Auburn Ravine”

March 24, 2014, Einar Maisch, "Update on PCWA issues" 

April 28, 2014, Tony Frayji, Frayji Design Group, Inc., “Update on Village 1 Development near  Hemphill Dam”





Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Fish Ladder at Lincoln Gauging Station Which Allows Salmon to Reach Marginal Spawning Grounds Above Lincoln




Lin

Salmon In Auburn Ravine With Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly with Chinook Salmon Attempting to Get Over Hemphill Dam









SARSAS General Meeting Agenda (OPEN TO THE PUBLIC) TUESDAY, May 28, 2013 at 10 am at 175 Fulwieler Ave, Auburn, Ca95603


SARSAS General Meeting Agenda
(OPEN TO THE PUBLIC)
TUESDAY, May 28, 2013
175 Fulweiler Avenue (the Domes), Auburn, CA 95603 
Contact: Jack Sanchez at 530-888-0281
Meetings are Fourth Monday of each month at 10-11 a.m.

I.      Self- introductions and sign-ins.   

II.    SARSAS Philosophy – We believe by working together with many individuals and agencies at the same table, we can achieve the mission of SARSAS, which is to return salmon and  steelhead to the entire 33 mile length of the Auburn Ravine
.
III. Featured Speaker:  Rocko Brown, Environmental Science Associates and  Phillip Williams and Associates, “Restoring Salmon Ecosystems”

IV. NOAA Special Agent Don Tanner, “Maintenance Issues on AR”

V. Jack Sanchez, President of SARSAS, “For the Good of the Order”

Scheduled speakers:

 June 24, 2013, Jack Sales, International Dark-Sky Association, “Salmon and Light Pollution”

July 24, 2013, Steve Hubbard, SARSAS Board Member and Videographer, Owner of Gold Country Images, “Power to the People: the Story of Hydroelectricity in the Sierra Nevada”

August 26, 2013, Beaver Specialist Mary Tappel, “Beaver Management in the Age of Salmonid Restoration with Focus on Beavers in Auburn Ravine"

September 23, 2013, Randy Hansen, SARSAS Fish Friendly Farming Coordinator, “Fish Friendly Farming Update”

October 28, 2013, SARSAS Fish Passage Specialist Ron Ott, “Fish Passage on the Auburn Ravine”

November 25, 2013, Placer County Supervisor Jim Holmes, “Placer County Water and the Auburn Ravine”

December 23, 2013, Richard Rivas, Natural Resources Conservation Services, Wildlife Biologist, “Declining Species Wildlife Habitat EQIP Initiative”

January 27, 2014, Placer Supervisor Robert Weygandt, “Update on the Placer County Conservation Plan”

February 24, 2014, Remleh Scherzinger, NID General Manager, “NID and the Auburn Ravine”

March 24, 2014, Einar Maisch, "Update on PCWA issues" 


Monday, April 22, 2013

SARSAS General Meeting Agenda (OPEN TO THE PUBLIC) TUESDAY, May 28, 2013


SARSAS General Meeting Agenda
(OPEN TO THE PUBLIC)
TUESDAY, May 28, 2013
175 Fulweiler Avenue (the Domes), Auburn, CA 95603 
Contact: Jack Sanchez at 530-888-0281
Meetings are Fourth Monday of each month at 10-11 a.m.

I.      Self- introductions and sign-ins.       

II.    SARSAS Philosophy – We believe by working together with many individuals and agencies at the same table, we can achieve the mission of SARSAS, which is to return salmon and  steelhead to the entire 33 mile length of the Auburn Ravine
.
III. Featured Speaker:  Rocko Brown, Environmental Science Associates and  Phillip Williams and Associates, “Restoring Salmon Ecosystems”

IV. NOAA Special Agent Don Tanner, “Maintenance Issues on AR”

V. Jack Sanchez, President of SARSAS, “For the Good of the Order”

Scheduled speakers:

 June 24, 2013, Jack Sales, International Dark-Sky Association, “Salmon and Light Pollution”

July 24, 2013, Steve Hubbard, SARSAS Board Member and Videographer, Owner of Gold Country Images, “Power to the People: the Story of Hydroelectricity in the Sierra Nevada”

August 26, 2013, Beaver Specialist Mary Tappel, “Beaver Management in the Age of Salmonid Restoration with Focus on Beavers in Auburn Ravine"

September 23, 2013, Randy Hansen, SARSAS Fish Friendly Farming Coordinator, “Fish Friendly Farming Update”

October 28, 2013, SARSAS Fish Passage Specialist Ron Ott, “Fish Passage on the Auburn Ravine”

November 25, 2013, Placer County Supervisor Jim Holmes, “Placer County Water and the Auburn Ravine”

December 23, 2013, Richard Rivas, Natural Resources Conservation Services, Wildlife Biologist, “Declining Species Wildlife Habitat EQIP Initiative”

January 27, 2014, Placer Supervisor Robert Weygandt, “Update on the Placer County Conservation Plan”

February 24, 2014, Remleh Scherzinger, NID General Manager, “NID and the Auburn Ravine”

March 24, 2014, Einar Maisch, “Auburn Ravine Water Update”



Sunday, April 21, 2013

SARSAS Summary of Minimum Water Flow on the Auburn Ravine Studies




  • INTRODUCTION

    The Auburn Ravine is a unique river when compared to other small waterways that feed the Feather River and Sacramento Rivers. Many western Sierra streams are ephemeral at present and in past history. While the Auburn Ravine was mistakenly classified as ephemeral historically, that classification was based upon faulty assumptions. In reality the Auburn Ravine was fed year round by any number of springs that existed historically. Some of those springs have since been destroyed by man, but some are still in existence. There were no less than five strong springs above Old Town Auburn, at least two smaller springs on the branch that follows Auburn Ravine Road in Auburn, three or more springs that feed the North Ravine, beginning just south of Atwood Road near the Placer County County Jail. Immediately downstream of Ophir Tunnel, two unnamed springs feed year round streams that currently flow into the Ravine as observed by Jack Sanchez, who was born and grew up in that exact location. On the Sanchez property, one or more springs feed what is known to the locals as Myrtle Creek just east of the Lozanos Bridge, crossing Sunset Lane in Ophir. Immediately downstream of Lozanos Bridge, Little Bridge Ravine, fed by multiple springs, one fork of which flows through Ophir Elementary School and the other fork through the grove of alders known to locals as Jiminy Crickets. One or more springs feed Dutch Ravine, running parallel to Highway 193, and joining Auburn Ravine downstream of Gold Hill Road. Two or more springs empty into the Auburn Ravine between Gold Hill Road and Fowler Road, downstream from the Rabe property on Stonewood Road. There are also some smaller springs that exist today between the Fowler Road and the City of Lincoln.

    The accumulation of these springs very likely placed a flow from between four and six cfs in the stream throughout the summer months and into the Fall. It is quite possible that the stream was ephemeral somewhere in the Lincoln area although there were numerous wetland ponds that survived the summer located west of Lincoln. It is abundantly clear that the Auburn Ravine from somewhere downstream of Fowler road east to the City of Auburn flowed year round.

    Clearly, that makes Auburn Ravine a unique stream as compared to hundreds of small streams that feed the Sacramento and Feather Rivers.

    Beginning mid-century during the Gold Rush, the Auburn Ravine began carrying irrigation water from Auburn to the Sacramento River. Thus, the Auburn Ravine began a significant change which allowed the river to contain steelhead and various seasonal salmon runs. It is unclear whether or not there were Spring Run Salmon within its banks, but Fall and Winter Run Chinook were observed through 1987 and up to1992 in one location 2.3 miles east of Gold Hill Road. The period 1987 to present is significant as man-made barriers were put in place and had a very negative impact upon Salmon populations within the Auburn Ravine. That said, at least 25 salmon were spotted below the NID Gauging Station in Lincoln as late as 2010.

    There is every reason to believe that Salmon and Steelhead will return in significant numbers as the various barriers are removed and the significant canals are screened.
    Minimum flows, however, must be maintained in order to protect the habitat. SARSAS has studied and observed the various flows within the Ravine and has data demonstrating the need to maintain minimum flows no lower than 10 cfs and preferably between 12 to 20 cfs.

    RATIONALE FOR SARSAS FLOW RECOMMENDATIONS

    First, it is important to understand that no government agency or water district has done more day to day observations and in-stream studies than SARSAS. Also, SARSAS strives to make sure that their studies adhere to good scientific standards. SARSAS has done the following studies: in stream flow rates, temperature measurement, dissolved oxygen levels and ph measurements.

    FINDINGS

    1. From approximately April 1 through October 15th (during the irrigation season) the daily flow in the Auburn Ravine ranges from a low of 50 cfs to a high of 250 cfs. The typical flow during these months is between 175 cfs and 250 cfs

    2. During PGE’s Fall Outage to repair canals, the lowest flow recorded by SARSAS was 1.5 cfs in both 2010 and 2011. Those measurements were taken west of the NID Auburn Ravine 1, known locally as the Gold Hill Dam. In some of the riverbed just west of the Gold Hill Dam, stretches of the river were actually dry with large numbers of fish stranded in deep pools causing SARSAS to rescue countless stranded fishes. Flows in the Auburn Ravine east of the Gold Hill dam were better with estimated flows of between seven and 10 cfs. Flow measurements were not done at that time east of Gold Hill dam.
    Measured flows of between 12 and 20 cfs clearly maintain good rifles and deep pools creating significant havens for larger as well as smaller fishes.

    3. Water Temperature
    During the irrigation season SARSAS has not measured an in-stream temperature above 60 degrees Fahrenheit east of Fowler Road. Water temperatures west of Lincoln do exceed 60 degrees and clearly there is evidence of fewer trout and more warm water
    species west of Highway 65. It should be noted that SARSAS perceives habitat west of Joiner Bridge in Lincoln as weak habitat for salmon, rainbow trout and steelhead. SARSAS sees this stretch of river as a highway to spawning grounds east of Highway 193 in Lincoln.
    During the Outage water temperatures can and do fluctuate considerably. When flows are in the 1.5 to 4 cfs range, temperatures occasionally rise into the high 60’s and algal bloom will at times be evident. Usually, water temperatures will be cooler during a Fall Outage as daytime temperatures are lower and night time temperatures are considerably lower, helping to keep water cooler. This same trend may or may not occur in the Spring Outages. When the flows are between 4 and 8 cfs, water temperatures tend to be better but not ideal - from 58 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit. Thse temperatures are somewhat equal whether in the fall or spring low flows.
    However, when the flows are between 10 and 18 cfs, the fall period will bring water temperatures between 55 and 60 degrees Fahrenheit. And the spring outages will be between 54 and 58 degrees Fahrenheit on average.

    4. PH Levels
    During the irrigation season the ph level is relatively constant – between 6.9 to 7.2
    During a flow of 1.5 to 4cfs, there is wide fluctuation - between 6.6 to 7.8
    During a flow between 10 and 18 cfs, there are fairly consistent levels of 7.0 to 7.4
    5. Dissolved Oxygen
    It should be noted that oxygen levels appear to be most heavily influenced by flow levels as follows:
    a. With flows between 18 cfs and 250 cfs, the readings east of Fowler road typically are at or above 58% with a high of 62%. SARSAS usually does not do regular tests when the flows exceed 50 or more cfs as there is little fluctuation in dissolved oxygen levels, and certainly SARSAS has not measured poor oxygen levels when stream flows are above 18 cfs.
    b. With flows between 1.5 to 4 cfs, dissolved oxygen levels have been measured as low as 19 % to as high as 30%
    c. With flows between 4 and 8 cfs, dissolved oxygen levels have been measured as low as 18% and as high as 45%
    d. With flows ranging between 10 and 18 cfs, the dissolved oxygen levels have been measured in the range of 48 to 60%

    5. PREDATION
    The primary predators within the Auburn Ravine are Grey Heron, Raccoon and fresh water Otters.
    During outages SARSAS members and some residents along the banks of the Auburn Ravine have observed the following:
    1. Heron have easy access to frogs, crawfish and smaller salmonids
    2. Raccoon have easy access to salmonids
    3. Fresh water Otter feast at will on salmonids within the shrunken pools

    Important considerations regarding flow between Wise Powerhouse and Lincoln

    When minimum flows are discussed it is critical to keep in mind the flow from in and around the Wise Powerhouse all the way to the City of Lincoln. It is not unusual during low flows to have a positive flow from the Wise Powerhouse to NID 1 commonly referred to as the Gold Hill Dam. NID has a large canal that removes water from the Auburn Ravine. It has not been unusual during low flows to have the entirety of the Auburn Ravine diverted into that canal leaving the Auburn Ravine below the dam completely without water. SARSAS has pictures(please see attached photos) Thus the only water is what accumulates in deep pools. This is an unacceptable practice as SARSAS has documented fish kills as well as rampant predation. Further, it leaves some of the best steelhead habitat in peril. The distance left dry during these occurrences is approximately 3.6 miles. At the point that Dutch Ravine enters the Auburn Ravine water will exist but at a cfs of approximately 1.5.

    SUMMARY

    SARSAS has studied the Auburn Ravine over the past four years in order to determine minimum flows that would suggest positive conditions for all riparian habitat, as well as those creatures living along and in the Auburn Ravine. The conclusion SARSAS has reached is flows below 12 cfs are detrimental to all habitat and species living within the Ravine, and, especially to salmonids. During outages two factors stand out as major problems for maintenance of a healthy habitat: 1. Dissolved oxygen levels; and 2. Predation; and, to a degree, water temperature. PH levels are not poor during outages but neither are they ideal.
    Therefore, given on-stream observation coupled with electronic measurement of water temperature, dissolved oxygen and ph levels and including issues with predation, SARSAS recommends a range of flow from 12 to 20 cfs. Further, SARSAS finds any flow below 10 cfs as dangerous to the maintenance of a healthy salmonid population.
    These recommendations are primarily focused upon the regions upstream of the Hemphill Dam.

    Further Considerations

    SARSAS recognizes that because the Auburn Ravine has ideal flows created by irrigation water, these conditions are ideal for habitat required by Spring Run Salmon. High flows, coupled with ideal temperatures, excellent dissolved oxygen levels, positive ph levels and a flow that creates deep cold pools enhance a positive habitat for these Spring Run Salmon. The only factor that would inhibit this ideal condition would be allowing flow levels below 12 cfs. That same factor can and should be applied to the threatened steelhead in Auburn Ravine.
    Clearly the Auburn Ravine is an excellent stream for trout, steelhead and salmon spawning. The only negative factor regarding habitat is maintenance of a suitable habitat for the salmonid species. Clearly, flow levels below the SARSAS
    recommendation should not be considered as viable.

    Contact information

    Jack Sanchez
    SARSAS President
    3675 Larkin Lane
    Auburn, CA95603
    530 888 0281
    Jlsanchez39@gmail.com